Sunday, June 22, 2014

Leonardo da Vinci’s Life and Legacy, in a Vintage Pop-Up Book | Brain Pickings

by


The legacy of the great artist, inventor, and
scientist in illustrated “interactive” paper engineering that would’ve
made Leonardo himself nod with delight.
As a lover of pop-up books, a celebrator of the intersection of art and science, and a great admirer of the vintage children’s book illustration of wife-and-husband duo Alice and Martin Provensen, I was instantly smitten with Leonardo da Vinci (public library)
— a glorious 1984 pop-up book that traces the life and legacy of the
legendary artist, inventor and scientist in gorgeous illustrations by
the Provensens and “interactive” three-dimensional paper engineering
that would’ve made Leonardo himself nod with delight.


In the spirit of previous efforts to convey the analog magic of vintage paper engineering in animated GIFs — including Bruno Munari’s “interactive” picture-books and this naughty Victorian pop-up book for adults
— I’ve animated a couple of the visuals, which is of course no
substitute for the hands-on whimsy but at the very least a whetting of
the appetite.







Leonardo da Vinci’s Life and Legacy, in a Vintage Pop-Up Book | Brain Pickings

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Shield and Crocus: Heros, Villains and A World Like No Other | Joe's Geek Fest







Underwood SHIELD CROCUS


Michael Underwood‘s Shield and Crocus is
an alternate world urban fantasy which contain a whole cast of
characters as villains, good guys, and semi-innocent bystanders. The
geography of the city, Audec-Hal, is that of a humanoid giant god, the
species are varied from the blue-skinned giant Freithin to the
yellow-skinned Ikanollo where all of the men look alike and as do the
women. The different races have various skills and, too top it all off,
there are spark storms which alter the citizens for Audec-Hal to give
them yet more individualistic funky powers. The heroes are the Shields
and the villains are a cartel of criminals, with lots of
in-fighting, who took over control of the city (and the City Mother) 50
years ago. Each run a district of the city. As the publisher blurb lays
it out:


Now, with nothing left to lose, First Sentinel
and the Shields are the only resistance against the city’s overlords as
they strive to free themselves from the clutches of evil. The only
thing they have going for them is that the crime lords are fighting each
other as well—that is, until the tyrants agree to a summit that will
permanently divide the city and cement their rule of Audec-Hal.
It’s one thing to take a stand against
oppression, but with the odds stacked against the Shields, it’s another
thing to actually triumph.



Michael R.Underwood

Much more can be found at:

Shield and Crocus: Heros, Villains and A World Like No Other | Joe's Geek Fest: Shield and Crocus: Heros, Villains and A World Like No Other

Thursday, June 5, 2014

God, Writing, and the Creative Process — Medium

 

“‘Ole!’ to you, just for having the sheer human love and stubbornness to keep showing up.”
— Elizabeth Gilbert



One
of the most rewarding things about being a writer — and that’s saying
something, as they are too many cool things to count (Working in
pajamas! Reading! Cats!) is sitting down with other writers and
discussing the creative process. It is the one topic that transcends all
others. Numbers matter not a whit when one is faced with the cosmic
opening that comes when another writer explains HOW THEY DO IT.
We
seek out tomes on the subject, gobble up blogs, tweet our heroes, take
friends to lunch, searching for nuggets of wisdom. I call it Seeking
OPP — Other People’s Process.
OPPs
are always shiny, exciting, logical. Everyone else’s process looks so
gloriously awesome, so intrinsic and organic. We listen at conferences,
smacking ourselves — Why didn’t I think of that? How come I don’t have
that level of understanding of my work? This must be why it takes so
long to write a book, I need to be doing X, or Y, or Z.
I
am a huge fan of the “How I Work” series on Lifehacker. Even though the
vast majority of the people don’t work in my industry, seeing them
drill down into what works and what doesn’t give me hope that one day, I
too will figure it out.
I have a long and varied list of things I do and own because of OPP. To name a few I can’t seem to live without:
  • Clairefontaine Notebooks
  • Levenger Circa Planner for research
  • Blackwing Pencils
  • Lamy Fountain Pens
  • MacAir
  • Scrivener
  • Evernote


God, Writing, and the Creative Process — Medium: God, Writing, and the Creative Process
How Books Are Made

“‘Ole!’ to you, just for having the sheer human love and stubbornness to keep showing up.”
— Elizabeth Gilbert